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Funders and other organizations often require research funded by them to be made freely available online.

Our Green OA policy helps authors to comply with these requirements by making a limited number of chapters from their books accessible in online repositories.

Our policy also specifies what content can be shared in commercial sharing sites. See our social sharing page for more information about social sharing.

Please also see our Rights and Permissions FAQs for additional rights we grant to authors to re-use their work.




Policy (Version 2)


This policy update makes a number of clarifications to our previous policy Version 1 (see below).

Our Green OA policy applies only to monographs. The policy does not apply to textbooks, professional books for practitioners, or works of reference, no part of which may be posted online without our prior approval.


Terms and definitions


We use the following terms and definitions:

Monograph: A book, typically but not always by a single author, which is an output of a research programme and which includes the findings of the research.

Preprint: An early version a monograph prior to the version submitted for publication. Theses and dissertations are considered to be preprints.

SMUR (Submitted Manuscript Under Review): The version of the monograph that is under formal review for publication.

AM (Accepted Manuscript): The version of the monograph that has been accepted for publication by Cambridge University Press. This version may include revisions resulting from peer review but may be subject to further modification by Cambridge University Press (for example, copy editing and typesetting).

VoR (Version of Record): The version that is formally published.

Personal webpage: Web pages created by you, about you and your research which are hosted on a non-commercial website (such as your institute’s website). Personal profile pages in commercial sharing sites (such as ResearchGate, Academia.edu and Facebook) are not considered to be personal web pages.

Department or institutional repository: Web pages hosted by an academic or research institute or department to provide access to the work to promote and the activities of the institute or department, at all times operating for a non-commercial purpose.

Subject repository: Web pages hosted by an organization to provide access to the work from researchers working in a subject or range of subjects, at all times operating for a non-commercial purpose.

Commercial and non-commercial: Commercial means any activity for direct or indirect financial gain. When considering whether a use is commercial or non-commercial, we look at the nature of the activity rather than the nature of the site or organization performing the activity.


What can be archived, where and when



Personal
web page

Department or institutional repository

Non-commercial subject repository
(e.g. arXiv.org)

Commercial repository or social media site
(e.g. ResearchGate, Academia.edu, SSRN)

Preprint,
SMUR

At any time

At any time

At any time

At any time

AM

One chapter six months after publication

One chapter six months after publication

One chapter six months after publication

One chapter six months after publication

VoR

One chapter six months after publication

One chapter six months after publication

One chapter six months after publication

One chapter six months after publication


Multiple authors and edited collections


For monographs with multiple authors, each contributor may archive their own single chapter. For co-authored chapters, the number of different chapters that are archived should be minimised.


Closed deposits and embargo periods


Chapters can be deposited in repositories before publication provided the content is only accessible to repository administration staff. This is sometimes referred to as ‘closed deposit’.

Metadata about the chapter (for example the book title, ISBN and so on) can be made public as soon as the monograph is published. The full text of the chapter must not be made public before the embargo ends.

Any applicable embargo period starts from the date the Version of Record is first published online.


Posting content online: Creative Commons and other end-user licenses


Preprints can be made publicly accessible under any license terms the authors choose. We recommend a Creative Commons CC-BY or a more restrictive CC license.

SMURs and AMs should not be made available under a Creative Commons license or equivalent. The monograph is contracted under standard publishing terms and therefore any reproduction or re-use of Green OA monograph chapters text is governed by our usual license restrictions. When posting chapters online, please include:

  • If monograph has not yet been published, a clear statement that the material has been accepted for publication in a revised form, with a link to the monograph’s site on cambridge.org (if available).
  • For all published works, a link to the monograph’s Version of Record in cambridge.org – for example, via a DOI-based link.
  • A clear statement about the license terms under which the posted chapter is deposited.


Example statements are:

  • This material has been published in [Title] by/edited by [Author / Editor] [http://doi.org/XXX]. This version is free to view and download for private research and study only. Not for re-distribution  or re-use. © insert copyright holder.
  • This material has been published in revised form in [Title] by/edited by [Author / Editor] [https://doi.org/XXX]. This version is free to view and download for private research and study only. Not for re-distribution  or re-use. © insert copyright holder.


Citing content in repositories


When citing an earlier version of a work, we request that readers also cite the Version of Record with a DOI link, for example: Subsequently published in revised form in [Title] by/edited by [Author / Editor] [http://doi.org/XXX].


Changes to our Green OA policy Version 1


We have clarified:

  • How we define monographs.
  • How we define personal webpages, departmental and institutional repositories.
  • How we define ‘non-commercial’ and ‘commercial’ use.
  • That chapters can be deposited in institutional or other repositories at any time as a closed deposit.
  • That preprints can be archived anywhere at any time, in the same way as submitted manuscripts, and that theses or dissertations can also be considered to be preprints.
  • That reprints can posted under any license the author chooses, including Creative Commons CC-BY.
  • How we determine the start of embargo periods.
  • How content deposited in Institutional Repositories should be cited by readers.